Buzz appointed Ambassador for Around the Campfire

Around campfire logo

Around the Campfire is an Adelaide based not for profit organisation committed to improving Indigenous health and literacy across Australia. During Around the Campfire events and promotional activities, there is a focus on education of non-Indigenous Australians about Indigenous Australian culture.  

The operational focus for Around the Campfire is the establishment of an Indigenous school nurse to assist the local clinic with primary health care, health promotion, and mentoring of local health industry students.

The program will be a joint initiative developed by the local health service and Around the Campfire, focusing on the needs and goals of the area. The main health goal of Around the Campfire is to reduce chronic disease of Indigenous Australians and close the life expectancy gap. If we can show evidence the level of health within the school population is improving we will be able to use the same model in other parts of the state and the country. 

We would like to speak with Aboriginal Health Services in South Australia about working together to achieve a reduction in chronic disease and closing the life expectancy gap.

 

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GANGGAJANG FIRST BAND TO BE ALLOWED TO

GANGgajang have been back on the map since a street was named after them in Bundaberg last November.

The band that reminded us This Is Australia in 1985 now widens its horizons with Circles In the Sand, featuring the first video ever shot at Uluru.

Drummer and co-writer Buzz Bidstrup has forged a bond with the site’s traditional owners in the Mutitjulu community through his work with the Jimmy Little Foundation, which will receive proceeds of the single.

“It reminds us once again who we are, where we live – and in doing so offers a glimpse of a different, more inclusive future,” he says. Read the full story here

THE ANGELS’ BUZZ BIDSTRUP ASKS AUSTRALIANS TO DIG DEEP FOR INDIGENOUS HEALTH

When musician Jimmy Little was dying three years ago he made one wish to his mate and manager Graham “Buzz” Bidstrup, asking him to continue running his namesake charity, the Jimmy Little Foundation.

“As he got sicker, he asked me, ‘You’re not going to let this go, are you?’,” Mr Bidstrup said.

“I promised him that I would keep running it as long as I’m here.”

Now a withdrawal of federal government funding has put a cloud over the future of the charity, which has launched a number of successful health programs in Aboriginal communities around Australia over the past decade. Read the full story here

An Interview with Graham ‘Buzz’ Bidstrup

In his over 40 years association with Australian music industry Graham “Buzz” Bidstrup has been a musician, songwriter, producer, manager and booking agent. His notable achievements include 4 albums with The Angels, co-founder of The Party Boys ( 3 albums) and GANGgajang (4 albums which he co-produced and managed).

Buzz’s other work includes over 50 albums as a producer including Australian Crawl‘s Reckless (musician and co-producer), Mondo Rock’s Chemistry (musician), film composer/music producer for Heatwave and Mad Wax; and music director for ABC series Sweet and Sour.

In this video, Steve also talks to Buzz about his latest project, The Dinosaurs, with Mark Gable(Choirboys), Mark Evans(AC/DC) and Les Gock (Hush). The segment goes behind the scenes into the rehearsal room and provides insight into the band’s writing process. Watch Here

Top End’s Music 4 Life makes Buzz Bidstrup a different kind of Angel

Bidstrup has been up in the Top End this week, working with Aboriginal communities in his role as head of the Jimmy Little Foundation, an organisation he helped found with the country legend Little and which continues to help indigenous groups with health, education and music programs.

The latest initiative is a music program called Music 4 Life, which is to be launched officially on Monday. Music 4 Life will visit schools in the Northern Territory twice a year and teach music skills such as singing, drumming, songwriting and playing the ukulele. Each five-day program will end with a performance by the students. Musicians in each of the communities will be encouraged to keep the program going all year round. Bidstrup spent this week in Arnhem Land, where another notable figure, Tony Abbott, has also been busy engaging with local communities. Bidstrup says his program has similar aims to goverment aspirations.

“We want to increase school attendance and employ Aboriginal people,” he says. “We have employed local musicians (who are also elders) from Milingimbi community to be at the school every day over the last four weeks to entice kids to come to school. A carrot rather than a stick. It has worked a treat, as school attendance has been higher since we engaged the local music mentors, and we are creating local employment.” You can find out more about Music 4 Life at http://www.music4life.net.au. Read More Here